Hormones Matter TM

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The Stress of Modern Living

November 29, 2011

I’m stressed, my friends are stressed, and let’s face it, the entire nation is stressed. In modern life, we’re bombarded with the daily list of to dos, the noise of 24 hour news and cable, the incessant activity of the internet and in the current economy, the constant threat of job loss and financial insecurity. True, the stressors we face today compared to those faced by previous generations are not generally life-threatening, but they are deadly, just over a longer period of time. Chronic stress, the underbelly of modern life (pun intended), is perhaps as much to blame for the increased rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes as are

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Turkey, Tryptophan and Testosterone

November 23, 2011

I wanted a little alliteration for the title of this week’s blog post and so turkey and tryptophan were naturals. Little did I know, testosterone was associated with this Thanksgiving Day tradition. We all know about the Turkey-tryptophan connection. Turkey contains high levels of the amino acid, tryptophan, the precursor for serotonin, and melatonin, the sleep hormone. Many have speculated that by ingesting high quantities of turkey on Thanksgiving, we increase our serotonin levels and hence, our ability to relax. It is more likely, however, that we increase our sleepiness quotient by increasing melatonin. Or as others suggest, perhaps we just eat too many carbs and throw our bodies in

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The match game of healthcare that works (Part III)

November 15, 2011

Care for yourself by assessing the “care” in your healthcare There’s a lot of discussion both within the medical profession and among average everyday patients and family members about what constitutes “quality” healthcare and “care” in general. As with most things in life, the nature of the discussion reflects the frame of reference of those doing the discussing.  The result: care is defined, and measured, differently depending on who is involved. For providers, “care” is typically what they can easily measure Hospitals generally tend to consider quality care, and its measurement, in three categories:  1)  what didn’t happen, for example: decreasing re-admissions or reducing or eliminating adverse drug interactions and

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How To Become A Thought Leader. Hint, You Have To Think.

And then act. A recent article on KevinMD,  “How Jenny McCarthy became a medical thought leader” bemoaning her role in the Autism/Vaccine conversation, got me thinking. What is it about the guilds of medical and academic science that all but prohibit listening to outsiders; that sanction who can ask questions or what types of questions can be asked? Why was a mere mortal, a mom no less, able to assume the role of the thought leader? Why not an academic or a physician? Aside from the Shakespearean truth- ‘hell hath no fury’ which doubly applies to moms protecting their young- Ms. McCarthy rose to this role precisely because she was

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The match game of healthcare that works (Part III)

Care for yourself by assessing the “care” in your healthcare There’s a lot of discussion both within the medical profession and among average everyday patients and family members about what constitutes “quality” healthcare and “care” in general. As with most things in life, the nature of the discussion reflects the frame of reference of those doing the discussing.  The result: care is defined, and measured, differently depending on who is involved. For providers, “care” is typically what they can easily measure Hospitals generally tend to consider quality care, and its measurement, in three categories:  1)  what didn’t happen, for example: decreasing re-admissions or reducing or eliminating adverse drug interactions and

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A 10 Year Battle with Hormones

November 14, 2011

As I look back I think I have always had hormone problems even as a teenager. But I would like to begin my story after my hysterectomy 10 years ago. I certainly didn’t understand or know what I know now or I would have probably never agreed to surgery so quickly. My initial consult for a hysterectomy was due to lower back pain and PMS symptoms. I was told I “probably” had endometriosis and agreed to surgery. It is odd to me now, at 46 years old and ten years after a partial hysterectomy, that I NEVER heard the potential downside of early menopause or perimenopause with or without ovaries.

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Picky, Burned Out and Clammy…

Mamma Mia, what’s going on? Why am I so picky? There must be a reason. so exhausted? It must be some work. and feeling so clammy? I’m not on a beach in the sun. Then again what about panic attack, low self-esteem, unsecured feeling, weight gain, boob changes….. Well I am 49 and all of this is happening to me. After some research and ladies’ talk I found out that I might be going through the pre-menopause. Went to the Doctor, got a blood test and BINGO I’m in the pre-menopause. But as far as the treatment is concerned, I’m not feeling better. My Gyneco prescribed another contraceptive pill which

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The Monthly Migraine

November 8, 2011

If about once a month, along with you menstrual cycle, you develop a pounding and often incapacitating head pain, you are not alone.  According to some studies, menstruation is a trigger for up to 60% of women who suffer with migraine.  Migraine, as defined by the International Headache Society, is an intense, throbbing headache with light or sound sensitivity, worsened by movement and with nausea or vomiting.  Judging by how common menstrual related migraine is, it seems clear that there is a relationship with the biologic changes during menstruation and the body’s processes that cause migraine.  What is not so clear is exactly why this happens. Research over the last

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Hormones, JFDI and Other Cool Things

I wasn’t able to write a blog post last week and instead had to focus my time on building software for the company, networking and the never ending quest for funding. As many of you know, we are bootstrapping. That means, much like a non-profit, we rely on a handful of committed individuals, working many, many hours without pay (thank you Lucine team). Of course we all hope that will change, but the economy is struggling and startup capital is difficult to come by. And, as I and others have written about previously, we’re building a business around decidedly ‘un-sexy’ diseases and conditions (not cool gadgety gizmos—although we’ll have some

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